Professor Bronwen Konecky Member of Climate Change Panel

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For the first of two programs on climate change, the wise and wonderful host of NPR’s Science Friday, Ira Flatow, will discuss with distinguished climate scientists Bronwen Konecky and Gavin Schmidt how studying past and present climate conditions can lead to the development of future strategies to protect the Earth.

The Great American Eclipse

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In the path of totality, some 300 incoming PhD and graduate students witnessed one of nature’s rarest phenomena — a total solar eclipse, visible only in the United States.

The Other Total Eclipse - Far in the Kuiper Belt

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William McKinnon, a planetary scientist in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis and a co-investigator on the NASA science team of New Horizons cheered on the the occultation team for catching MU69’s fleeting shadow in precisely the right place at the right time on July 17.

Professor McKinnon testifies at House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology

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Dr. William B. McKinnon, professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences in Washington University in St. Louis, Co-Chair of National Academy of Sciences, Committee on Astrobiology and Planetary Science, explained the planetary science decadal survey and its relation to flagship and other planetary missions.

Curiosity, Opportunity Mars Rovers: Sol Sisters for Science

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Ray Arvidson, the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, deputy principal investigator of the rover mission, explained the current situation and plan for the veteran Opportunity rover.

A Spillway on Mars?

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Ray Arvidson, Opportunity Deputy Principal Investigator of Washington University in St. Louis, the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor in Arts & Sciences, describes a geological puzzle rover is trying to solve.

Death by volcano

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David Fike, associate professor of earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences, described what happened when pulses of atmospheric carbon dioxide and sulfate aerosols were intermixed at the end of the Ordovician geological period more than 440 million years ago.

Professor Wiens Named Robert S. Brookings Distinguished Professor

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Douglas Wiens was installed as the Robert S. Brookings Distinguished Professor in Arts & Sciences at a ceremony held Feb. 21 in Holmes Lounge at Washington University in St. Louis. He is the second faculty member to hold this professorship, which was established in 2006.

See our Virtual Geology Lab

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Washington University's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences is transforming education with the opening of the Virtual Geology Lab. Associate Professor Philip Skemer is building his own 3D holographic models that can be viewed with Microsoft HoloLens.

Seismic Sleuthing

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Dr. Ghassan Aleqabi and Dr. Michael Wysession, Seismologists in Washington University in St. Louis, investigates enemy attacks, terrorism and nuclear tests by seismic sleuthing.

Release of water shakes Pacific Plate at depth

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Tonga is a seismologists’ paradise, and not just because of the white-sand beaches. The subduction zone off the east coast of the archipelago racks up more intermediate-depth and deep earthquakes than any other subduction zone, where one plate of Earth’s lithosphere dives under another, on the planet.

MoonRise mission to the Moon

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Bradley Jolliff, a professor of earth and planetary sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, and the leader of the proposed MoonRise mission, commented on his team's proposal for a NASA mission to go back to the moon's unexplored far side.