Back Results for: Research

Seismic study reveals huge amount of water dragged into Earth’s interior

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Slow-motion collisions of tectonic plates under the ocean drag water into the deep Earth...

Professor Arvidson: Mars Opportunity Rover in the Dust Storm

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Arvidson's interview with HEC TV about the Mars Rover Opportunity, its silence due to the large dust storm, and prospects for the recovery and continued operations.

Professor Jeff Catalano: Heavy Metals in the Wetlands

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Scientists from cross disciplines at Washington University in St. Louis are investigating how the abundance of heavy metals in natural wetlands affects how much of these gasses are produced in aquatic systems.

Professor Bob Criss On Our Rivers

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Criss has championed the Mississippi, Missouri and Meramec rivers, among others, in more than 25 years of work in earth and planetary sciences at Washington University in St. Louis.

Mantle xenon has a story to tell

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The Earth has been through a lot of changes in its 4.5 billion year history, including a shift to start incorporating and retaining volatile compounds from the atmosphere in the mantle before spewing them out again through volcanic eruptions.

Professor Ray Arvidson: Organic Compounds on Mars

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What ‘warm and wet’ planetary history means for prospects of life on Mars

In the News: Arvidson about Mars Rover Mission

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When Opportunity’s 5000th day dawned in February, it was a meaningful milestone for the team, and it led to a personal first for the veteran robot field geologist that has chalked up so many firsts she’s set the standard for Mars rovers.

In the News: Criss about the Mississippi River

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“To understand America at this time,” says R.D. James, a Missouri farmer and new Army assistant secretary overseeing its Corps of Engineers, “you have to understand the river.”

Arvidson to receive Weidenbaum Center Award for Excellence

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The Weidenbaum Award for Excellence was established in 2014 by the Weidenbaum Center on the Economy, Government, and Public Policy

Small Distant World with Ring

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Special Delivery for Noble Gas Research

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This summer, WashU received a new and very special instrument: a noble gas isotope ratio mass spectrometer.

Climate Panel Member

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The first climate change panel discussion on September 18, 2017 will feature climatologists discussing how the study of past and present climate conditions can aid in the development of future strategies to protect Earth.

In the Field: Geology of the Azores

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Volcanic craters, fumeroles and hot springs mark the rugged landscape of São Miguel island, in the remote Portuguese Azores, where undergraduate students from Washington University in St. Louis traveled to study field geology techniques during their 2018 spring break.

The Mars Exploration Rovers Update: Opportunity Logs 5000th Day, Snaps Selfie, and Roves On

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See our Virtual Geology Lab

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Washington University's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences is transforming education with the opening of the Virtual Geology Lab. Associate Professor Philip Skemer is building his own 3D holographic models that can be viewed with Microsoft HoloLens.

Seismic Sleuthing

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Dr. Ghassan Aleqabi and Dr. Michael Wysession, Seismologists in Washington University in St. Louis, investigates enemy attacks, terrorism and nuclear tests by seismic sleuthing.

Release of water shakes Pacific Plate at depth

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Tonga is a seismologists’ paradise, and not just because of the white-sand beaches. The subduction zone off the east coast of the archipelago racks up more intermediate-depth and deep earthquakes than any other subduction zone, where one plate of Earth’s lithosphere dives under another, on the planet.

MoonRise mission to the Moon

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Bradley Jolliff, a professor of earth and planetary sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, and the leader of the proposed MoonRise mission, commented on his team's proposal for a NASA mission to go back to the moon's unexplored far side.

Sending Humans to Mars

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What will it take to get humans to Mars? Science writer Andrew Fazekas sits down with two Mars experts, Jedidah Isler and Ray Arvidson, to talk about the challenges we face getting to and establishing a permanent settlement on the red planet.

Life on Pluto?

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William McKinnon, professor of earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis and a co-author on two of four new Pluto studies published Dec. 1 in Nature, argues that beneath the heart-shaped region on Pluto known as Sputnik Planitia there lies an ocean laden with ammonia.

What’s up with Madagascar?

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Michael Wysession, professor of earth and planetary sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, explains why there are volcanoes on Madagascar, an island that isn’t near any tectonic boundaries.

Professor McKinnon on YouTube with Pluto

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Dr. Bill McKinnon of Washington University suspected a liquid ocean beneath the surface of Pluto, published remarkable findings about Pluto that surpassed expectations about the dwarf planet and explained how a large section of Pluto’s nitrogen ice surface is renewed by a process called convection.

Reaching the Final Frontier: NASA’s New Horizons Mission to Pluto…and Beyond!

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William McKinnon of Washington University has a long career as a planetary scientist that has been marked by a series of exciting discoveries and new explorations.

A terrible rift

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Doug Wiens, professor of earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, and Weisen Shen, a postdoctoral research associate with Wiens, installed a seismometer to investigate the Midcontinent Rift and presented seismic images of the rift at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America (GSA) Sept. 25-28.

Professor Arvidson wins Lester W. Strock Award from the Society of Applied Spectroscopy

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Raymond Arvidson, earth and planetary science professor at Washington University in St. Louis, received the Lester W. Strock Award, which is given by the New England Section of the Society of Applied Spectroscopy in recognition of a selected publication of substantive research in/or application of analytical atomic spectrochemistry in the fields of earth science, life sciences, or stellar and cosmic sciences.

Moon condensed from Earth's mantle

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Kun Wang, assistant professor in Earth and Planetary Sciences in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, reported isotopic differences between lunar and terrestrial rocks that provide the first experimental evidence that can discriminate between the two leading models for the moon’s origin.

Martin's Antarctic field season blog (2016-2017)

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Martin J. Pratt, research scientist having recently completed my PhD at Washington University in St. Louis, software developer for the Fossett Laboratory for Virtual Planetary Exploration at WashU, embraced augmented reality platforms in order to display complex concepts within the Earth Sciences.

Steaming a planet

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Bruce Fegley and Katharina Lodders-Fegley, respectively professor and research professor in earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, published models of the chemistry of a steam atmosphere in equilibrium with a magma ocean at various temperatures and pressures, which provided some suggestions for planet hunters.

Mapping sinkholes

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Washington University geologists mapped the huge, branching drainage system that underlies the plain that is called Fogelpole Cave, located just below the notch in the west side of Illinois, where Mississippian limestones are exposed at the surface.

Class Act: Pierre Haenecour

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Pierre Haenecour, student in Washington University in St. Louis, reflected on his discovery of a new type of grain, why space research matters and how he made time to serve Washington University while conducting groundbreaking research.

Mongibello Mons

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William McKinnon, professor of earth and planetary science in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, published a computer model that is able to make numerical mountains that look much like the jutting rock slabs on Io.

Exploring the Moon from Orbit – Paving the Way for Future Astronaut Explorers

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Dr. Ryan Clegg-Watkins, McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences Postdoctoral Research Associate, Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, used Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images to study the effects of rocket exhaust on lunar soil and to investigate silicic volcanic regions of the Moon.

Brain Discovery: Bringing Scientists Into the Classroom

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Graduate students Claire Weichselbaum and Brian Lananna discuss their outreach program that brings neuroscience into classrooms.

Rites & Wrongs

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Randy Korotev, a lunar geochemist from Washington University in St. Louis, helped people distinguish between meteorites and "Meteorwrongs", chunks of rock and metal that masquerade as meteorites.

How to Create a Neuroscience Pipeline

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Erik Herzog shares some of his outreach efforts to support and encourage younger neuroscience researchers.

Forensic Seismology: Watch this video!

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A Baghdad seismometer picked up on Earth-shaking explosions in Iraq. Using the 2006 seismic record, Washington University seismologists distinguish wartime mortars, rockets, improvised explosive devices, helicopters and drones.

Martian water: Watch this video!

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Washington University’s Dr. Raymond Arvidson, a prominent Mars researcher, breaks down new information about liquid water flowing on the surface of Mars. Arvidson explains his involvement analyzing the data and discusses the next step.

Don't Panic Geocast - Learn about the Moon

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Brad Jolliff, earth and planetary science professor at Washington University in St. Louis, talks about lunar rocks and meteorites. The moon turns out to be a fascinating place, but probably won’t break up like in Seveneves.

Record Missouri flooding was manmade calamity

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At the end of December 2015, a huge storm named “Goliath” dumped 9-10 inches of rain in a belt across the central United States, centered just southwest of St. Louis, most of it in a three-day downpour. Robert Criss, PhD, professor of earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, says there is more to the flood than the rain.